Nkolandom Prehistoric Site

Nkolandom Prehistoric Site

Ebolowa, Cameroon

Nkolandom is located in the Southern part of Cameroon at 18 km from Ebolowa on the road Ebolowa town called Nkolandom, Ambam passing by Mekomo and spreads over 2km. The road winding through Mvila hills and valleys leads to the small town called Nkolandom, the Mountain of Elegance.The Nkolandom caves, the caves of the Customary court the cave with engraved writing the peak of the adjap the caves of Nkomeyos, the peak of Ako’Okas.

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MOUNT ATLANTIKA

Mount  Atlantika The Koma people, renowned for their authentic lifestyle mountainous area is unique. The Koma, farmers refugees in the Mountains Alantika(“Allah Ntikanin the local language which means “reached by God alone”) under the pressure of the Fulani invasion, retained its ancient civilization, away from the main lines of communication. In this cultural sanctuary, the people simply dressed in loincloths, reinvented every day the fire, thanks to the magic of flint.

The temperature of the montain sometimes reaches Alantika 5 degrees, and the sun scorching which falls on these mountains is during the dry season, a considerable obstacle for agriculture.Salt, rice, and other foods, are among others who are pleasure to present Koma mountain.It is not advisable to give them clothes, afraid to acculturate and greatly contribute to the devaluation of their traditions.For people in good physical condition, this circuit requires a lot of stamina. A sensational challenge any man should overcome at least once in his life to gauge its ability to face danger and brave the most dangerous events.Mountains in Alantika, climbs or descents are sometimes steep, but everyone can do it at their own pace. Porters and trackers accompany always slower as the fastest.Every day, taking the breakfast is very morning followed by departure for hiking, with small stops and longer in the middle of the morning.Around noon, lunch, rest (nap) and the decline of the sun to 15:30 departure forabout two hours of walking in beautiful scenery, tinted ocher end of the day. Nights in tents, often near a village.

 

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Ring Road Tour

DAY: 2

Ring Road Tour

Discover this very important road that links all the divisional headquarters of the North -West region of Cameroon.At the end of the tour you will realize that you’ve gone through some of the most beautiful and exotic landscapes in the world, which are quite suitable for adventure and nature lovers,that you’ve got much fulfillment as concerns cultural immersion,that you’ve been exposed to one of the most conducive climates in the world which is so comforting to your health

This tour can be done in both directions, starting with Wum or Ndop. Be careful, if you intend to turn, leave at least 2 4×4 for the portion between Wum Nkambe andis very rugged. You will discover a variety of landscapes, very hilly with beautiful steps and many chiefdoms.

DAY: 1

Early breakfast Camp in the Aboh village. Departure for lake Oku through the Ijim/Kilum Mountain forest reserve, which harbours a great variety of tree species and birds, especially the famous, colourful Bannerman’s Touraco, whose sound has been imitated by the villagers in one of the instruments used in their traditional music, called the “Njang”. The red feather from this bird is used to differentiate titled men, by sticking it on the typical caps of the Tikar chiefdoms in the North West Province

Breakfast at Camp. You can choose from today’s option:

  • Horse riding around the village. The local Fulani will serve as your groom and guide.
  • Visit to the compound of the father of the Fon in the Aboh village, introduction to the history of the Kom dynasty
  • Walk around the Aboh village, visiting local families and getting acquainted with every day life in an African village.
  • Visit one of the local bars (why not?)joining the people in drinking the locally brewed beer from corn, called “nkang”

Return to the Camp after the day’s activities. After dinner a local dance will be organised around a camp fire. Dinner and overnight in tents.

Day 3 :Belo – Bamenda

Breakfast and departure by motor bike to Belo. Board a public bus to Bamenda. Arrival in Bamenda at the Mile Four Motor Park and take a township taxi to the Guest House. Lunch and visit to the Mankon palace and museum. Listen to the stories of their ancestral lineage, view the traditional art and craft of the Mankon kingdom. Take a taxi back to Bamenda  rest of the evening at leisure in the garden, dinner and overnight.

Day 4: Bamenda – Douala

Breakfast and departure by taxi to Amour Mezam bus station at Mile Two. Board a bus for Douala, which takes off at 9 or 10 am. On the way the bus will stop at Melong for lunch for about 15mins. Arrival in Douala by 4pm. Take a township taxi to a restaurant or hotel to refresh. Dinner and departure by taxi to the airport for the departure flight.

End of Tour

OR

What to do locally

Ndop: The asphalted road to Ndop is good with an impressive view. Bamessing just after a steep descent, take the track on the right. It takes you to a very nicepottery. Later, stop at Babungo and leadership in 3000 masks. The place is dusty but the multitude of masks worth of oil.

-Kumbo: This city will offer you a choice of hotels for the night.

Jakiri road in Kumbo is good and alternate track and bitumen. Kumbo you can continue to Nkambé from or toward the center of the ring-road to explore Mount Oku.

-Oku: Allow one hour from Kumbo. Onsite tourist office will provide you with all the information you need and offer you a guide.

Lake, waterfall, grotto, hike, there are many possibilities.

Nkambe: We have not pushed so far. Just be aware that the road is more difficult, and landscapes more virgins!

Bafut: On the other side of the ring-road, the first step is Bafut and leadership (one of the oldest in the region). avoid the botanical garden, which will gently laughinggarden owners ª

-Towards Wum you will find waterfalls Menchum. The road runs along the rice fields.

Hotels / Restaurants

Hotels are plentiful on the Ring Road and you will find the main steps you stay.

Bafut, Wum, Jakiri (small hotel), Kumbo, Bamenda Nkambe well. For meals, discover the local cuisine!

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landscapes of Kapsiki / Rhumsiki In Maroua

 The picturesque landscapes of Kapsiki / Rhumsiki In Maroua, is a famous village Rhumsiki. The trail that leads to dramatically during 45Km winds through themountain range where Kapsiki strange monoliths looming volcanic dykes, tops sometimes a hundred meters. The village is an impressive backdrop of peaks anddykes.  “the crab sorcererwho will tell you your past and predict your future then, with blacksmiths, tanners, potters and artisans in. The camp Rhumsiki consists of 26 rooms in comfortable air-conditioned bungalows, restaurant and bar, hot shower, wc.In the village, the Camp Rhumsiki offer you accommodation in rustic comfort.The Mandara Mountains region is conducive to trekking from one village to another to discover their habits and customs, with nights under the stars unforgettable

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Trips to the two national parks is also on the itinerary; the Waza national park and the Benoué national park.
You will be able to see lions, girafes, elephants and monkeys up close.

Day 1

-Arrival and reception at Douala International Airport

– Transfer to hotel and overnight

Day 2

– Travel to Yaoundé

– Yaoundé City tour

– Transfer to train station

– Travel to Ngaoundéré by train (all night)

Day 3

– Arrival at Ngaoundéré

– Transfer to hotel

– Visit of the Lamidat of Ngaoundéré

– Horse-back riding

– Diner and overnight in hotel

Day 4

Visit of the Benoué National Safari Park

– Diner and overnight in camp

Day 5

– Travel to Rey Bouba

– Visit to the market, here you will find Bororo women who come to sell naturally-extracted milk

– Diner and overnight at the Boubba Ndjidda camp

Day 6  

– Visit to the Boubba Ndjidda National Park

Day 7

– Travel to Grand Capitaine

– Watch hippopotamus on sand and cog jester

– Fishing and overnight

Day 8

– Travel to Garoua, Pitoa market day.

– Diner and overnight in Garoua

Day 9

– Travel to Rhumsiki

– Visit of the “Gorge de Kola”

– Visit to the blacksmith

– Dinner and overnight in Rhumsiki

Day 10

– Hike to the Cameroon/Nigeria border

– Visit to the traditional music instruments artist

– Visit to the traditional weavers

– Visit to the crab fortune teller

– Dinner and overnight at the Rhumsiki camp

Day 11

– Travel to Mokolo

– Visit of the Mafa’s market, this is a very populated region

– Dinner and overnight in Mokolo camp

Day 12

Shopping and returning back to airport of douala .

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TRI NATIONAL TOUR

Highlight
Forest Elephants – Gorillas – Bongos – Sitatunga – Dwarf Buffaloes – Chimpanzees- Ba’Aka pygmies – Net hunting – Traditional medicines -Trekking – Traditional dance – Boat and Canoe ride – Pygmies camp – Lobe waterfalls – Seasid…e relaxation – Marine Tortoise Museum …

Introduction
Tri – National safari Explore19 is an expedition designed for nineteen days exploring the core of the Congo basin visiting the tri – national park that comprises Lobeke in Cameroon, Nouabale Ndoki in Congo and Dzanga Sangha in Central African Republic. This is an adventure as it requires physical fitness and spirit of an adventure. Through travelling in long distances in asphalted roads, sailing by canoe and trekking deep under the evergreen canopy of the Congo basin being the second vast & incredible rainforest in the world after the Amazon, will give us the opportunity to witness endemic wildlife such as Forest Elephants, Western lowland Gorillas, Chimpanzees, Leopards, Sitatungas, Buffaloes, Bongos… and numerous birds specie not living out traditional dance, net hunting and initiation to traditional medicines offered by the Ba’Aka pygmies. Sailing by canoe to pygmies camp, visit to marine tortoise museum and relaxation at the white sandy beach in Kribi are added to crown this unforgettable experience.


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Itinerary
Day 1: Sunday: Arrival Yaounde
Day 2: Monday: Yaounde – Bertoua
Day 3: Tuesday: Bertoua – Yokadouma
Day 4: Wednesday: Yokadouma – Lobeke (camp Combo)
Day 5, 6: Lobeke (Mirador 1-3)
Day 7: Saturday: Lobeke – Bomassa – Nouabale Ndoki
Day 8, 9: Nouabale Ndoki (Mbeli bai & Mondika)
Day 10: Tuesday: Mondika – Bomassa – Bayanga
Day 11: Wednesday: Bayanga (Sangha bai)
Day 12: Thursday: Bayanga (Bai Hokou)
Day 13: Friday: Bayanga (Ba`Aka Pygmies)
Day 14: Saturday: Bayanga – Nola – Yokadouma
Day 15: Sunday: Yokadouma – Bertoua
Day 16: Monday: Bertoua – Yaounde
Day 17: Tuesday: Yaounde – Kribi
Day 18: Wednesday: Kribi
Day 19: Thursday: Kribi – Douala – Return Flight.

Detail Program

Day 1: Sunday: Arrival Yaounde
Meet and greet at Yaounde Nsimalen airport, transfer to hotel , briefing, dinner and night.

Day 2: Monday: Yaounde – Bertoua
Early breakfast, we board our vehicle and head to Bertoua. The 338 km driving is not an issue, the road is asphalted in a great distance as we traverse the forest of the Centre Plateau. We arrived Bertoua late in the afternoon and check in at Mansa Hotel for the night.

Day 3: Tuesday: Bertoua – Yokadouma
The real part of the adventure commence today with a dirt road that stretches on 279km linking Bertoua to Yokadouma. There is perpetual encounter with timber trucks loaded from numerous logging companies exploiting great part of this side of the Congo basin. We arrived Yokadouma in the evening and check in at Elephant hotel where we spend the night.

Day 4: Wednesday: Yokadouma – Lobeke
We drive along the thick rainforest into the Lobeke National park at the south most part of Cameroon. Arrival and check-in at Combo camp for the night.

Day 5, 6: Lobeke
These two days are spent in Lobeke. After early breakfast each day, we take a forest walk in the national park and embark in animal safari in quest for big mammalian species that are endemic to the region such as elephants, monkeys, gorillas, sitatungas, bongos, buffaloes etc. Trails lead us to various platforms of observation . This Park also constitutes part of the tri – national park of Dzanga Sangha in the Central African Republic that we also have in our program and the Nouabale Ndoki national park of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Dinner and night in tents.

Day 7: Saturday: Lobeke – Bomassa – Nouabale Ndoki
At Lobeke, we depart early crossing the Sangha River by boat from Djembe to get to Bomassa in Congo. After about an hour drive from Bomassa and one and a half hour by canoe including an hour trek, we arrived Mbeli camp, installation, dinner and night at the Camp.

Day 8, 9: Nouabale Ndoki National Park
During these days, we trek through the evergreen canopy in the heart of this part of the Congo basin to watch forest elephants, antelopes, birds, hedgehog, Red River hog etc. on a well settled platform including tracking of western lowland gorillas with nights at both Mbeli and Mondika camp.

Day 10: Tuesday: Mondika – Bomassa – Bayanga
After visiting Lobeke and Nouabele Ndoki national park, the next and last part of our tridom safari adventure is Dzanga Sangha at Bayanga which we attained late in the evening. Dinner and night at Doli Lodge.

Day 11: Wednesday: Bayanga (Sangha bai)
Our centre of interest today at the Dzanga Sangha national park is Dzanga Bai where hundreds of forest elephants, sitatungas, Bongos, dwarf buffalos, and numerous birds meet at the saline as they look for mineral salts to facilitate digestion.
After about 30 minute drive and about an hour walk in the heart of the forest, we attained Dzanga Bai and comfortably sit on the platform as we observe pure game scenery in the jungle.
Late in the afternoon, we return to the Lodge where we are honored with Ba’Aka traditional dance before dinner time.

Day 12: Thursday: Bayanga (Bai Hokou)
After early breakfast at the Lodge, we head to Bai Hokou where knowledgeable pygmy guides are waiting for us for the Western Lowland Gorillas safari trekking. We go after them up to the last camp where the Gorilla spent the night. An hour and half in their company gives us the opportunity to experience their social life and feeding behavior. We later return to the research centre, and continue the explore by tracking mangabeys. Later we board our 4×4 car and drive back to the Lodge.

Day 13: Friday: Bayanga (Activities with the Ba’Aka pygmies)
Our last day visit at Dzanga Sangha comprises net hunting expedition with the Ba’aka folks, introduction to traditional medicine by the pygmies who will show us how they use plants to heal themselves when sick, cultural excursion to Yadoumbé a famous and typical Ba’Aka settlement to learn more about their architecture, cuisine and daily life style.

Day 14: Saturday: Bayanga – Nola – Yokadouma
After our safari expedition to CAR, we return to Cameroon where we attained Yokadouma late in the evening, check in at Elephant hotel and night.

Day 15: Sunday: Yokadouma – Bertoua
After breakfast, our return continues with night in Bertoua at Mansa hotel.

Day 16: Monday: Bertoua – Yaounde
After driving for several hours, we attained Yaounde, dinner and night.

Day 17: Tuesday: Yaounde – Kribi
Today we head to the South of Cameroon in Kribi where we crowned our safari adventure by seaside relaxation, dinner and night at hotel Ilomba.

Day 18: Wednesday: Kribi
After early breakfast, we drive to Lobe River and next sail by canoe to pygmies camp. After a warm welcome and visit to the pygmies sandwitched by traditional dance, we then board our canoe and return to Kribi. We visit Lobe waterfalls, get relax at the white sandy beach before retired to the hotel for the night.

Day 19: Thursday: Kribi – Douala – Return Flight
Possibility for an excursion to Ebodje fishing village to visit the museum for the conservation of marine tortoise. Return and continuation to Douala, transfer to the airport, departure formalities and return flight.

Included:
Meet & greet – Airport assistance –  Ground transportation – fuel – tollgates & driver – Boat & Canoe ride – Double room occupancy  – Ba’Aka dance – Net hunting – All visit & activities as in program – Professional field guide – Porters – Local guides – Mineral water – Full board – Ellephant viewing – Gorillas tracking – Park fees – Nights in tents.

Not Included:
Visas & International flight – Personal purchase of souvenirs – Laundry – Gratuities – All visit & activities not mentioned in program – Drinks – Personal & travel insurance – Life jacket.

If people are to develop love and concern of the earth, they need direct experience: otherwise their knowing remains remote and theoretical and never touches them deeply

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THE REMAINS OF SLAVE TRADE FOUND IN CAMEROON

BIMBIA SLAVE VILLAGE

Cameroon is one of those countries that suffered from the slave trade and the first African country . The Portuguese, one of the European countries that were engaged in the business of buying slaves, ivory and other items from Africa, reportedly reached the Cameroonian coast by 1472. From the Wouri Estuary where they landed and established contacts with the local coastal chiefs soon stretched their business contacts to Bimbia. By dint of its coastal location, Bimbia suddenly grew to become a significant trade port for slaves bound for plantations in the Americas and neighbouring islands of Tome, Principe, Fernando Po, today Equatorial Guinea. And Bimbia is the route through which very many Cameroonians, in the 1500s, 1600s and 1700s, passed through to reach plantations aboard.

Bimbia was an independent state of Isubu people of Cameroon, in 1884 annexed by the Germans and incorporated in the colony of Kamerun. It lies in Southwest Region, to the south of Mount Cameroon and to the west of the Wouri estuary. Is situated at the East coast of the Limbe Sub Division. Bimbia consists of three villages: * Dikolo *Bona Ngombe * Bona Bille In 1932 when the population of Bimbia was about 2500peoples. Bimbia was the first place whitemen, the Jamaican and English Baptist missionaries led by Rev. Alfred Saker set foot on the Cameroon shore in 1858, from Fernando Po. There he built the first schooland first church. Later he went to Victoria where he built the Ebenezer Baptist church. The Bimbia man was the first person to go to Saker’s school and the first to become christian.

Origins

The predominant Isubu oral history holds that the ethnic group hails from Mboko, the area southwest of Mount Cameroon. Tradition makes them the descendants of Isuwu na Monanga, who led their migration to the west bank of the Wouri estuary. When a descendant of Isuwu named Mbimbi became king, the people began to refer to their territories as Bimbia.

European contacts

Joseph Merrick at an Isubu funeral in Cameroon, 1845.

Portuguese traders reached the Wouri estuary in 1472. Over the next few decades, more Europeans came to explore the estuary and the rivers that feed it, and to establish trading posts. The Isubu carved out a role for themselves as middlemen, trading ivory, kola nuts, andpeppers from the interior. However, a major commodity was slaves, most bound for plantations on nearby islands such as Annobon,Fernando Po, Príncipe, and São Tomé.[3]

Some Bimbia legend[citation needed] grants Ekum’a Makundu, a formerDikolo chief, to have said that “it was when Alfred Saker came with his christian religion we stopped the slave trading. The Bimbia used to catch some none natives and sell them as slaves to the Spanish ships that came to Bimbia but never landed because they were afraid of the natives whom they termed “savages” “. Ekum’a Makundu used to be a pirate and fought the Spanish people for their properties. The Spanish people got furious and decided to bomb Dikolo – Bimbia. When the information reached the locals, they made visible peace signal; when the Spaniards came back, some indigenes went to the sea to meet them and make a peace pact and promised never to worry them again.

By the 16th century, the Isubu were second only to the Duala in trade. The earliest Isubu merchants were likely tribal chiefs or headmen.[4]Bimbia, the primary Isubu settlement, grew quickly.

Europeans traders did their best to support friendly chiefs against their rivals, adulating them with titles such as King, Prince, or Chief. In exchange, these indigenes offered trade monopolies to their patrons and sometimes ceded land.[citation needed] An Isubu chief named Bilebecame leader of the Isubu as King William, although Dick Merchant of Dikolo village and other chiefs eventually opposed his dominance.

British influence

British traders became the dominant European presence in the region by the mid-19th century, and the Crown used them to enforce abolitionof the slave trade in the Gulf of Guinea. In 1844 and 1848, King William signed anti-slavery treaties. In exchange, the traders provided him with annual gifts of alcohol, guns, textiles, and other goods.[4] William was also asked to forbid practices the British viewed as barbaric, such as sacrificing a chief’s wife upon his death.[5] With William’s blessing, Bimbia became a haven for repatriated slaves and escapees from the illicit trade, which continued for many more years.

The British also endeavored to educate and Christianise the Bimbians.[6] King William rebuffed the earliest missionaries because he did not agree with their insistence on prayer and opposition to polygamy. In 1844, however, Joseph Merrick convinced William to let him open a church and school in Bimbia.[7] In 1858, the Spanish ousted Protestant missionaries from their base at Fernando Po. King William sold a portion of his domains to the missionary Alfred Saker, who then founded Victoria (today known as Limbe). By 1875, numerous missions and schools sprung up in Victoria and other settlements. Victoria came to be a mixture of freed slaves, working Cameroonians, and Christianised Cameroonians from the various coastal groups. Cameroonian Pidgin English began to develop at this time.

Isubu society was changed fundamentally by the European trade. European goods became status symbols, and some rulers appointed Western traders and missionaries as advisors. Large numbers of Isubu grew wealthy, leading to rising class tensions. Competition escalated between coastal groups and even between related settlements. Between 1855 and 1879, the Isubu alone engaged in at least four conflicts, both internal and with rival ethnic groups. Traders exploited this atmosphere, and beginning in 1860, German, French, and Spanish merchants had established contacts and weakened the British monopoly. The Duala had gained a virtual hegemony over trade through the Wouri estuary, and the Isubu had little power left. Young King William was virtually powerless when he succeeded his father in 1878.[8]

Treaties

On 17 February 1844, King William I of Bimbia and the chiefs of Bimbia concluded a treaty with Lieutenant Edward Charles Earl, commander of the English brig Rapid in which the slave trade was prohibited in exchange for goods worth $1,200, and free trade was guaranteed.[9] On 19 December 1850, a further treaty with Thomas Rodney Eden, captain of the Amphitrite, regulated trade terms, covering subjects such as payment of “comey”, a customary fee paid by trading vessels to chiefs in exchange for permission to trade.[10] On 7 February 1855, the British Acting Consul, J.W.B. Lynslager, witnessed an engagement in which the chiefs of the Boobee (Bubi) Islands, adjacent to the Amboise (Ambas) Islands, settled the recent dispute and acknowledged King William of Bimbia’s authority.[11]

German protectorate

A German protectorate over the Cameroons was declared on 12 July 1884. In a communication of 15 October 1884 the German Government described the territories included in the protectorate, which included Bimbia.[12]

Economic activities

Fishing and Farming

The Bimbia are mostly fishermen. In the thirties the fishing industry was florishing. Fishing is a communal labour as it was not possible for one man to be able to set up his fishing equipment. Therefore the men of the village came together and made the equipment of one person then went to the other.

Technics

The Bimbia man fishes in many different ways namely: Ndemba, Ngoto, Mbunja, Efese and Moleke.

The women are yam planters. People come to buy benyanya, smoked njanga, smoked mwanjamoto and other fish. Women come from chop farm with raw food to exchange for fish and bring things like accra banana, groundnuts and koki beans.

The women dry all the fish, sell it or battler for household needs. During the dry season, the men go to sea in the night. The women work until morning on the efefe to sort out the fish in their different species, put on very big baskets called ‘ndenge’ and start drying them on the ‘wokas’. Woka is a stab make of bamboos from the palm tree. Then carry the wokas to the ‘etaka’ or bandas where a long fire is made to smoke the fish at night. The dried benyanya is stored away to give way for other fish to be dried also. When the season for meyo is over, the season for mwanjamoto and crayfish (njanga) starts.

Women are from the sale of fish responsible for looking after of all the house needs such as soap, oil, salt, kerosene etc. Men are responsible for the sale of the big benyanya to pay school fees.

Chiefs

Dikolo has six quarters : Mbeng’a Liwoka, Bali, Wona Wonanya, Wona Ngowe, Wona Mbimbi and Mabetefutu with their family heads and a traditional chief.

Bimbia chieftaincy stool dose not rotates. It is in the same family for all generations.

  • In Dikolo the Ekum’a Makundu family have the chieftaincy and it is not contested for.
  • In Bona Ngombe the Musuka family have the chieftaincy.
  • In Bona Bille the Billa Lozenge family have the chieftaincy, the descendants of king William of Bimbia.

    Early European contacts

    Joseph Merrick at an Isubu funeral in Cameroon, 1845.

    Portuguese traders reached the Wouri estuary in 1472. Over the next few decades, more Europeans came to explore the estuary and the rivers that feed it, and to establish trading posts. The Isubu carved out a role for themselves as middlemen, trading ivory, kola nuts, andpeppers from the interior. However, a major commodity was slaves, most bound for plantations on nearby islands such as Annobon,Fernando Po, Príncipe, and São Tomé.[3]

    Some Bimbia legend[citation needed] grants Ekum’a Makundu, a formerDikolo chief, to have said that “it was when Alfred Saker came with his christian religion we stopped the slave trading. The Bimbia used to catch some none natives and sell them as slaves to the Spanish ships that came to Bimbia but never landed because they were afraid of the natives whom they termed “savages” “. Ekum’a Makundu used to be a pirate and fought the Spanish people for their properties. The Spanish people got furious and decided to bomb Dikolo – Bimbia. When the information reached the locals, they made visible peace signal; when the Spaniards came back, some indigenes went to the sea to meet them and make a peace pact and promised never to worry them again.

    By the 16th century, the Isubu were second only to the Duala in trade. The earliest Isubu merchants were likely tribal chiefs or headmen.[4]Bimbia, the primary Isubu settlement, grew quickly.

    Europeans traders did their best to support friendly chiefs against their rivals, adulating them with titles such as King, Prince, or Chief. In exchange, these indigenes offered trade monopolies to their patrons and sometimes ceded land.[citation needed] An Isubu chief named Bilebecame leader of the Isubu as King William, although Dick Merchant of Dikolo village and other chiefs eventually opposed his dominance.

    British influence

    British traders became the dominant European presence in the region by the mid-19th century, and the Crown used them to enforce abolitionof the slave trade in the Gulf of Guinea. In 1844 and 1848, King William signed anti-slavery treaties. In exchange, the traders provided him with annual gifts of alcohol, guns, textiles, and other goods.[4] William was also asked to forbid practices the British viewed as barbaric, such as sacrificing a chief’s wife upon his death.[5] With William’s blessing, Bimbia became a haven for repatriated slaves and escapees from the illicit trade, which continued for many more years.

    The British also endeavored to educate and Christianise the Bimbians.[6] King William rebuffed the earliest missionaries because he did not agree with their insistence on prayer and opposition to polygamy. In 1844, however, Joseph Merrick convinced William to let him open a church and school in Bimbia.[7] In 1858, the Spanish ousted Protestant missionaries from their base at Fernando Po. King William sold a portion of his domains to the missionary Alfred Saker, who then founded Victoria (today known as Limbe). By 1875, numerous missions and schools sprung up in Victoria and other settlements. Victoria came to be a mixture of freed slaves, working Cameroonians, and Christianised Cameroonians from the various coastal groups. Cameroonian Pidgin English began to develop at this time.

    Isubu society was changed fundamentally by the European trade. European goods became status symbols, and some rulers appointed Western traders and missionaries as advisors. Large numbers of Isubu grew wealthy, leading to rising class tensions. Competition escalated between coastal groups and even between related settlements. Between 1855 and 1879, the Isubu alone engaged in at least four conflicts, both internal and with rival ethnic groups. Traders exploited this atmosphere, and beginning in 1860, German, French, and Spanish merchants had established contacts and weakened the British monopoly. The Duala had gained a virtual hegemony over trade through the Wouri estuary, and the Isubu had little power left. Young King William was virtually powerless when he succeeded his father in 1878.[8]

    Treaties

    On 17 February 1844, King William I of Bimbia and the chiefs of Bimbia concluded a treaty with Lieutenant Edward Charles Earl, commander of the English brig Rapid in which the slave trade was prohibited in exchange for goods worth $1,200, and free trade was guaranteed.[9] On 19 December 1850, a further treaty with Thomas Rodney Eden, captain of the Amphitrite, regulated trade terms, covering subjects such as payment of “comey”, a customary fee paid by trading vessels to chiefs in exchange for permission to trade.[10] On 7 February 1855, the British Acting Consul, J.W.B. Lynslager, witnessed an engagement in which the chiefs of the Boobee (Bubi) Islands, adjacent to the Amboise (Ambas) Islands, settled the recent dispute and acknowledged King William of Bimbia’s authority.[11]

    German protectorate

    A German protectorate over the Cameroons was declared on 12 July 1884. In a communication of 15 October 1884 the German Government described the territories included in the protectorate, which included Bimbia.[12]

    Economic activities

    Fishing and Farming

    The Bimbia are mostly fishermen. In the thirties the fishing industry was florishing. Fishing is a communal labour as it was not possible for one man to be able to set up his fishing equipment. Therefore the men of the village came together and made the equipment of one person then went to the other.

    Technics

    The Bimbia man fishes in many different ways namely: Ndemba, Ngoto, Mbunja, Efese and Moleke.

    The women are yam planters. People come to buy benyanya, smoked njanga, smoked mwanjamoto and other fish. Women come from chop farm with raw food to exchange for fish and bring things like accra banana, groundnuts and koki beans.

    The women dry all the fish, sell it or battler for household needs. During the dry season, the men go to sea in the night. The women work until morning on the efefe to sort out the fish in their different species, put on very big baskets called ‘ndenge’ and start drying them on the ‘wokas’. Woka is a stab make of bamboos from the palm tree. Then carry the wokas to the ‘etaka’ or bandas where a long fire is made to smoke the fish at night. The dried benyanya is stored away to give way for other fish to be dried also. When the season for meyo is over, the season for mwanjamoto and crayfish (njanga) starts.

    Women are from the sale of fish responsible for looking after of all the house needs such as soap, oil, salt, kerosene etc. Men are responsible for the sale of the big benyanya to pay school fees.

    Chiefs

    Dikolo has six quarters : Mbeng’a Liwoka, Bali, Wona Wonanya, Wona Ngowe, Wona Mbimbi and Mabetefutu with their family heads and a traditional chief.

    Bimbia chieftaincy stool dose not rotates. It is in the same family for all generations.

    • In Dikolo the Ekum’a Makundu family have the chieftaincy and it is not contested for.
    • In Bona Ngombe the Musuka family have the chieftaincy.
    • In Bona Bille the Billa Lozenge family have the chieftaincy, the descendants of king William of Bimbia.
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CamTourVentures

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CAMEROON

You are a group of  professional, friend, villager,   etc.. you want to share the thrill together explore our beautiful country and strengthen the bonds of brotherhood that bind us. We’re here to help you “live your dream”

WILDLIFE

             

Park WAZA: Wealth of national parks is one of the highlights of Cameroon. Its reserves have indeed one of the most diverse faunas across Africa. The majority of parks are concentrated in the north. The most popular are those of the Benue and Waza but parks and reserves Bouban’djida, Campo, Faro and Dja, also open to the public, are just as interesting. the discovery of national parks, discover the cultural and historical heritage, discovering ecotourism sites. Savannas of northern Cameroon have one of the wildlife populations richest and most varied in Africa. With its national parks, the North is the ideal place to discover the African wildlife.

HIGHLANDS                                                                                  FLORA

     

There are a few main areas of vegetation in Cameroon, all of which offer diverse plant life and ecosystems.

The south is made up of dense rain forests covered by orchid, fern and hardwood evergreen trees including mahogany, ebony, obeche, dibetu, and sapelli which can grow to over 200 feet. This merges into the central area which has semi-deciduous forests.

Along the coastal areas and rivers there are dense mangroves and palm rich areas. Northern areas are then comprised of wooded savanna with scattered trees, moving to sparser areas covered with Acacia.

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WATERFALLS

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Ekom Nkam fall. The falls are beautiful and magnificent scenery. The descent to the foot of the falls is not easy, no protection, mud, rocks rolling, accompanied by tour guide. At the foot of the fall a beautiful sight.

LAKES

  

Water catchment region of Cameroon, this Region is full of crater lakes, cattle ranches, underground minerals, wild animal species and several caves

3 HECTARES   OF  STONY  LANDSCAPE

    

Imagine an area of over 3 hectars with thousands of tons of rock out of sight, with multiple colors and impressive; Imagine all these carved stones, carved and shaped like works of art and some models reach 20 m depth . in Cameroon, in the Northern Province, a hundred kilometers from Garoua, Guider 12km from, your imagination becomes reality when you come across Gorges Kola. Real mystery at the same time the gift of nature, this treasure full of many wonders that no written or documentary can not really reproduce authenticity. That is why we urge you to take a look, you will not be disappointed

CULTURES / ARTS

      

The museum Babungo

The museum located in Cameroon Ndop presents a sample of objects important and significant of the rich cultural and artistic heritage of Babungo, formerly the most important center for the metal in Cameroon. The treasure of kings talented sculptors Babungo with thousands of parts, is still the most impressive of all the Grassland.

 

MOUNT CAMEROON

     

Mount Cameroon is one of the highest volcanoes in Africa and the world at large and rises 4,095 metres. Stepped 200m from the sea it is now one of the most visited tourist’s spots in the country. It has very beautiful plateaus of the southern region. These areas are dominated by Equatorial forests and form part of the Atlantic Equatorial Coastal Forests Eco-region.

This active volcano is the highest mountain in West Africa, rising more or less straight from the Gulf of Guinea.

A 3 day Mt Cameroon Climb treks through the tropical rainforest to a stark and chilly summit that is occasionally brushed with snow.

  

Rhumsiki’s surroundings are “one of the most beautiful landscapes in the world.”The spectacular effect is created by surrounding volcanic plugs (the remnants of long-dormant volcanoes), basalt outcroppings, and the Mandara Mountains. The largest (and most photographed) of these rocks is Kapsiki Peak, a plug standing 1,224 m (4,016 ft) tall.

EQUATORIAL  FOREST

  

The tropical rainforest at elevations between 4,000 and 8,000 feet (1,200 and 2,400 metres) differs from that of the lowlands: the trees are smaller, are of different species, and are festooned with mosses, lichens, and other epiphytes. Above the rainforest zone are drier woodlands, tall grasslands, or patches of mountain bamboo. Above about 7,800 feet (2,400 metres) in the interior and above…

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